The LM324 Quad Op-Amp Line Follower Robot with Pulse Width Modulation

Designing a simple and yet functional Line Follower Robot (LFR) is always a fascinating and challenging subject to be learned, the LFR actually could be implemented in many ways start from a simple two transistors to a sophisticated PID (Proportional, Integrate and Differential) which take advantage of the programmable feature of microcontroller to calculate the PID equation to successfully navigate the black track line on a white background surface.

Designing a non microcontroller based LFR is quite challenging tasks as we need to limit the electronic components numbers so the LFR will not too complicated to be built by most average robotics beginners or electronic hobbyists, but at the same time we need to have a good speed control mechanism in order for the LFR to navigate the black track line successfully. The microcontroller based design LFR in the other hand is a popular choice because it reduces a number of electronic components significantly while still providing a flexible programmable control to the LFR. You could read more information at ermicroblog

Using Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) with Microchip PIC18 Families Microcontroller

The Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) is one of the popular embedded serial communications widely supported by many of today’s chip manufacture and it considered as one of the fastest serial data transfer interface for the embedded system. Because of its special in/out register configuration, the SPI master device could transfer its data and at the same time it receive a data from the SPI slave device with the clock speed as high as 10 MHz. Beside its superior data transfer speed; SPI also use a very simple data transfer protocol compared to the other serial data transfer methods. ou could read more information at ermicroblog

Integrating Wiznet W5100, WIZ811MJ network module with Atmel AVR Microcontroller

The rapid penetration of the internet networks into many of today’s modern homes and personal gadgets (e.g. smart phone and smart pads) opening a tremendous useful and interesting embedded system application that could be integrated into our house or known as the intelligent house. For example by putting a small embedded system web server in our house, we could easily monitor such as alarm, temperature or even turn on/off the lamp or the garden’s water sprinkle; eventually from any remote location through the wireless personal gadget; Or perhaps you just want to impress your relative or friend with a very accurate digital clock which automatically synchronized the time through the Network Time Protocol (NTP) over the internet at your home or office. You could read more information at ermicroblog

Stepping Into the 16-bit World with the Microchip 16-bit PIC24F16KA102 Family Microcontroller

One of the commonly asked questions when we move to the bigger and powerful 16-bit microcontroller is do we really need it? As the 8-bit microcontroller is already suite almost all of our needs from a simple blinking LED to more sophisticated embedded application such as robotics. Despite the debate whether to use the 8-Bit or 16-Bit microcontroller or perhaps just go straight to 32-bit microcontroller in our embedded system design, first I will show you the Microchip PIC18F25J11 (8-Bit) and PIC24F16KA102 (16-bit) basic comparison. You could read more information at ermicroblog

Building your own Simple Laser Projector using the Microchip PIC12F683 Microcontroller

The 8 pins PIC12F683 microcontroller is one of the smallest members of the Microchip 8-bit microcontroller families but equipped with powerful peripherals such as ADC and PWM capabilities. This make this tiny microcontroller is suitable for controlling the DC motor speed. In order to demonstrate the PIC12F683 capabilities and to make this tutorial more attractive, I decided to use the PIC12F683 microcontroller to generate simple and yet fascinating laser light show from a cheap keychain laser pointer. You could read more information at ermicroblog

Working with the Comparator Circuit

Sometimes in the embedded system world we need to process the analog world and sending the signal to the microcontroller when the analog signal exceed some predetermine limit we’ve set. Some example of this situation is to send the interrupt signal to the microcontroller operation when the temperature is already exceeds certain limit or the light intensity exceeds certain bright level. This is when the comparator circuit becomes handy as it’s designed specially for this purpose. You could read more information at ermicroblog

Build Your Own Simple and Easy PICAXE Microcontroller Based Photovore Robot

Building a simple and easy microcontroller based robot is always a fascinating topic to be discussed, especially for the robotics newbie enthusiast. On this tutorial I will show you how to build your own microcontroller based robot which known as a photovore or you could call it as the light chaser robot using the simplest possible circuit for the microcontroller based robot brain, locomotion motor and the sensor. You could read more information at ermicroblog